Thiamine transporter 2 is involved in high glucose-induced damage and altered thiamine availability in cell models of diabetic retinopathy

Published on 2019-11-16T13:07:17Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Thiamine prevents high glucose-induced damage in microvasculature, and progression of retinopathy and nephropathy in diabetic animals. Impaired thiamine availability causes renal damage in diabetic patients. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in <i>SLC19A3</i> locus encoding for thiamine transporter 2 are associated with absent/minimal diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy despite long-term type 1 diabetes. We investigated the involvement of thiamine transporter 1 and thiamine transporter 2, and their transcription factor specificity protein 1, in high glucose-induced damage and altered thiamine availability in cells of the inner blood–retinal barrier. Human endothelial cells, pericytes and Müller cells were exposed to hyperglycaemic-like conditions and/or thiamine deficiency/over-supplementation in single/co-cultures. Expression and localization of thiamine transporter 1, thiamine transporter 2 and transcription factor specificity protein 1 were evaluated together with intracellular thiamine concentration, transketolase activity and permeability to thiamine. The effects of thiamine depletion on cell function (viability, apoptosis and migration) were also addressed. Thiamine transporter 2 and transcription factor specificity protein 1 expression were modulated by hyperglycaemic-like conditions. Transketolase activity, intracellular thiamine and permeability to thiamine were decreased in cells cultured in thiamine deficiency, and in pericytes in hyperglycaemic-like conditions. Thiamine depletion reduced cell viability and proliferation, while thiamine over-supplementation compensated for thiamine transporter 2 reduction by restoring thiamine uptake and transketolase activity. High glucose and reduced thiamine determine impairment in thiamine transport inside retinal cells and through the inner blood–retinal barrier. Thiamine transporter 2 modulation in our cell models suggests its major role in thiamine transport in retinal cells and its involvement in high glucose-induced damage and impaired thiamine availability.</p></div>

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Beltramo, Elena; Mazzeo, Aurora; Lopatina, Tatiana; Trento, Marina; Porta, Massimo (2019): Thiamine transporter 2 is involved in high glucose-induced damage and altered thiamine availability in cell models of diabetic retinopathy. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4742141.v1