The (un)intended effects of street-level bureaucrats’ enforcement style: Do citizens shame or obey bureaucrats?

Published on 2020-02-28T13:06:20Z (GMT) by
<div><p>This paper studies the intended and unintended effects of street-level bureaucrats’ enforcement style. More specifically, it answers to what extent street-level bureaucrats’ enforcement style affects citizens’ obedience (i.e. intended effect) during face-to-face encounters and willingness to publicly shame bureaucrats (i.e. unintended effect). Building on insights from street-level enforcement and the social interactionist theory of coercive actions, a trade-off is theorized between the effect of enforcement style on citizens’ on-the-spot obedience and on public shaming. Results of an experiment (<i>n </i>=<i> </i>318) and replication (<i>n </i>=<i> </i>311) in The Netherlands reveal that (1) neither the legal nor facilitation dimension has an effect on on-the-spot obedience; (2) the legal dimension does not affect public shaming but (3) the facilitation decreases it. These findings are robust across both the experiment and replication.</p></div>

Cite this collection

de Boer, Noortje (2020): The (un)intended effects of street-level bureaucrats’ enforcement style: Do citizens shame or obey bureaucrats?. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4875162.v1