The Association Between Veteran Status and Obesity Differs Across Race/Ethnicity

Posted on 14.01.2022 - 01:06
Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the interaction between veteran status and race/ethnicity on obesity status.

Design

Cross-sectional survey

Setting

The 2013–2017 National Health Interview Survey

Sample

A total of 151,765 adults (8.62% veterans and 91.38 nonveterans) with 69.30% identifying as White, 13.05% identifying as Hispanic, 12.57% identifying as Black, and 5.08% identifying as Asian

Measures

Obesity status (measured using self-reported body mass index), race/ethnicity, survey year, age, marital status, educational attainment, federal poverty level, health insurance, type of insurance, self-reported health status, and whether participant had a usual care source.

Analysis

Weighted logistic regression analysis

Results

In a fully adjusted model, there was no evidence that veterans overall had higher odds of obesity compared to nonveterans (adjusted odd ratio (aOR): 1.05, 95% CI: .99, 1.11). White veterans had lower odds of obesity compared to White nonveterans (OR: .93, 95% CI: .87, .98). Hispanic veterans had higher odds of obesity compared to Hispanic nonveterans (aOR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.90). There was no evidence of an association between veteran status and obesity status for Black and Asian adults.

Conclusions

Effectual prevention strategies are needed to decrease obesity risks among active and retired Hispanic veterans.

CITE THIS COLLECTION

Cuevas, Adolfo G.; Cofie, Leslie E.; Nolte, Sarah (2021): The Association Between Veteran Status and Obesity Differs Across Race/Ethnicity. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.5792353.v1
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