Social Network Intervention Reduces Added Sugar Intake Among Baltimore Public Housing Residents: A Feasibility Study

Published on 2020-03-03T13:06:25Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Public housing residents have high intake of added sugars, which is associated with sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in their social networks. In this feasibility study, we designed and tested a network-oriented intervention to decrease added sugar intake by encouraging reduced SSB consumption. We conducted a 6-month single-arm trial testing a small-group curriculum (9 sessions) that combined behavior change strategies to reduce added sugar intake by promoting SSB reduction with a peer outreach approach. We recruited and trained public housing residents to be “Peer Educators,” who then communicated information and made changes to reduce SSB with their network members. We calculated the median number of group sessions attended and determined the percentage of individuals satisfied with the program. We estimated added sugar intake using a 5-factor dietary screener and compared baseline and 6-month median values using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. We recruited 17 residents and 17 of their network members (n = 34). Mean age was 45.7 years, 79.4% were women, and 97.1% were African American. Median number of sessions attended was 9 (interquartile range: 4-9), and 88.2% were very satisfied with the program. Overall, baseline median added sugar intake was 38.0 tsp/day, which significantly declined to 17.2 tsp/day at 6 months (<i>P</i> < .001). Residents and network members achieved similar results at 6 months (17.4 vs 16.9 tsp/day, respectively). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that a social network intervention aimed at reducing SSB consumption is feasible and can produce significant decreases in adult added sugar intake, which warrants further investigation in a randomized controlled trial.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Gudzune, Kimberly A; Opara, Onumara; Martinez, Jonathan C; Doshi, Ruchi S; Levine, David M; Latkin, Carl A; et al. (2020): Social Network Intervention Reduces Added Sugar Intake Among Baltimore Public Housing Residents: A Feasibility Study. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4878777.v1