Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review

Published on 2020-01-14T07:06:34Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Recurrent pain and school failures are common problems in children visiting the school nurses office. The overall aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between recurrent pain and academic achievement in school-aged children. Literature was searched in seven electronic databases and in relevant bibliographies. Study selection, data extraction, and study and evidence quality assessments were performed systematically with standardized tools. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and 13 verified an association between recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, and musculoskeletal pain) and negative academic achievement. Two longitudinal studies indicated a likely causal effect of pain on academic achievement. All studies had substantial methodological drawbacks and the overall quality of the evidence for the identified associations was low. Thus, children’s lack of success in school may be partly attributed to recurrent pain problems. However, more high-quality studies are needed, including on the direction of the association and its moderators and mediators.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Ragnarsson, Susanne; Myleus, Anna; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Sjöberg, Gunnar; Rosvall, Per-Åke; Petersen, Solveig (2019): Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4409627.v2