Premature Myocardial Infarction in the Middle East and North Africa: Rationale for the Gulf PREVENT Study

Published on 2019-11-26T15:06:21Z (GMT) by
<div><p>The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has a high burden of morbidity and mortality due to premature (≤55 years in men; ≤65 years in women) myocardial infarction (MI) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Despite this, the prevalence of risk factors in patients presenting with premature MI or ACS is incompletely described. We compared lifestyle, clinical risk factors, and biomarkers associated with premature MI/ACS in the MENA region with selected non-MENA high-income countries. We identified English-language, peer-reviewed publications through PubMed (up to March 2018). We used the World Bank classification system to categorize countries. Patients with premature MI/ACS in the MENA region had a higher prevalence of smoking than older patients with MI/ACS but a lower prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Men with premature MI/ACS had a higher prevalence of smoking than women but a lower prevalence of diabetes and hypertension. The MENA region had sparse data on lifestyle, diet, psychological stress, and physical activity. To address these knowledge gaps, we initiated the ongoing Gulf Population Risks and Epidemiology of Vascular Events and Treatment (Gulf PREVENT) case–control study to improve primary and secondary prevention of premature MI in the United Arab Emirates, a high-income country in the MENA region.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Dugani, Sagar B.; Murad, Waheed; Damilig, Karisamae; Atos, Jean; Mohamed, Eshraga; Callachan, Edward; et al. (2019): Premature Myocardial Infarction in the Middle East and North Africa: Rationale for the Gulf PREVENT Study. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4519796.v2