Predicting Special and General Educators’ Intent to Continue Teaching Using Conservation of Resources Theory

Published on 2019-10-15T12:10:02Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Retaining teachers is an important priority for school leaders, especially in special education, a field with chronic shortages. We analyzed a nationally representative survey using conservation of resources theory to examine how job demands and resources interacted with one another and with teachers’ assignments (i.e., as special and general educators) to predict intentions to continue teaching. We found that teachers were more inclined to stay in their schools when they experienced stronger school administrative and collegial support, had more access to instructional materials, and were more experienced. Teachers indicated weaker intent to stay when they experienced more problems with students, spent more time working, were less experienced, and served in higher-poverty schools. School administrative support moderated relationships between intent and (a) school poverty and (b) experience. We found no differences between special and general educators’ intent to stay, though we did find differences in the conditions predicting special versus general educators’ intent.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Bettini, Elizabeth; Gilmour, Allison F.; Williams, Thomas O.; Billingsley, Bonnie (2019): Predicting Special and General Educators’ Intent to Continue Teaching Using Conservation of Resources Theory. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4698473.v1