How to Teach Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work: A Systematic Review

Published on 2019-05-26T12:00:00Z (GMT) by
<div>Purpose:<p>This article presents a systematic review of research regarding how best to educate social work students and practitioners concerning of the process of evidence-based practice and/or the application of empirically supported treatments (ESTs).</p>Method:<p>We conducted a systematic review with a narrative synthesis, largely following the <i>Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews for Interventions</i> and <i>PRISMA</i> reporting guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.</p>Results:<p>Twenty-seven studies met our eligibility criteria. These consisted mostly of uncontrolled designs and their measures relied mainly on learners’ self-perception regarding acquisition of declarative and procedural knowledge, motivation, and satisfaction. Reports were mostly positive (88.7%).</p>Conclusions:<p>Research regarding the education of social work students and practitioners about the process of evidence-based practice as well as ESTs is limited. Further investigation is needed concerning the effectiveness of specific teaching methods using controlled designs and more rigorous outcome measures including observation of practice in real-life situations and/or in role-plays.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Spensberger, Florian; Kollar, Ingo; Gambrill, Eileen; Ghanem, Christian; Pankofer, Sabine (2019): How to Teach Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work: A Systematic Review. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4519754.v1