Enigmas of grievances about inequality: Effects of attitudes toward inequality and government redistribution on protest participation

Published on 2019-03-13T12:00:00Z (GMT) by
<div><p>This study explores the multifaceted calculus behind engagement in protests using data from 45 countries in the World Values Survey Wave 6 (2010–2014), employing a hierarchical linear model. It expands the current scholarship on protest politics by investigating how individual subjective assessment and evaluation of income inequality, and redistributive preferences influence participation in protests. We found that protest is a powerful outlet used by highly educated citizens with strong grievances about economic inequality, and labor union networks, especially <i>in advanced industrialized countries.</i> The empirical analysis further reveals that the salience of redistributive preferences may effectively filter individual responses and become channeled into action in protests in a broader sample. Moreover, we show that the impact of grievances about inequality on protest becomes significant when government social spending is increased and the level of inequality is high. Conversely, conventional macro-level indicators on their own, such as the Gini coefficient of income disparity and social spending, did not explain variance in protest participation. Findings suggest that more systematic research is necessary to detect the precise mechanisms at play that link grievances about inequality and the exponential expansion of protest politics.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Jo, Jung-In; Jin Choi, Hyun (2019): Enigmas of grievances about inequality: Effects of attitudes toward inequality and government redistribution on protest participation. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4433855.v1