Does education decrease Euroscepticism? A regression discontinuity design using compulsory schooling reforms in four European countries

Published on 2019-10-10T12:06:28Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Previous research shows a strong and consistent relationship between educational attainment and Euroscepticism. As a result, education is considered to be a powerful predictor of attitudes towards European integration. However, these findings are predominantly found using cross-sectional research designs, therefore leaving open the possibility of strong selection effects due to pre-adult experiences and dispositions which both explain educational attainment and political attitudes. To test whether schooling causally reduces Euroscepticism, this article combines data on the compulsory schooling age with seven rounds of pooled European Social Survey data (2002–2014). Using compulsory schooling reforms within a ‘fuzzy’ regression discontinuity design, the results indicate no conclusive effect of education on Euroscepticism, questioning the impact of additional schooling. Consequently, this study provides a novel insight into the much-debated divide in support for European integration between lower and higher educated.</p></div>

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Kunst, Sander; Kuhn, Theresa; van de Werfhorst, Herman G (2019): Does education decrease Euroscepticism? A regression discontinuity design using compulsory schooling reforms in four European countries. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4693277.v1