Do (Microtargeted) Deepfakes Have Real Effects on Political Attitudes?

Published on 2020-07-26T12:06:23Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Deepfakes are perceived as a powerful form of disinformation. Although many studies have focused on detecting deepfakes, few have measured their effects on political attitudes, and none have studied microtargeting techniques as an amplifier. We argue that microtargeting techniques can amplify the effects of deepfakes, by enabling malicious political actors to tailor deepfakes to susceptibilities of the receiver. In this study, we have constructed a political deepfake (video and audio), and study its effects on political attitudes in an online experiment (<i>N</i> = 278). We find that attitudes toward the depicted politician are significantly lower after seeing the deepfake, but the attitudes toward the politician’s party remain similar to the control condition. When we zoom in on the microtargeted group, we see that both the attitudes toward the politician and the attitudes toward his party score significantly lower than the control condition, suggesting that microtargeting techniques can indeed amplify the effects of a deepfake, but for a much smaller subgroup than expected.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Dobber, Tom; Metoui, Nadia; Trilling, Damian; Helberger, Natali; de Vreese, Claes (2020): Do (Microtargeted) Deepfakes Have Real Effects on Political Attitudes?. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.5073707.v1