Complement system activation and peritoneal membrane alterations: Culprit or innocent bystander?

Published on 2020-01-14T13:06:15Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Peritoneal dialysis (PD) accounts for approximately 10% of the dialysis population worldwide. Major concern limiting long-term PD success is the loss of the peritoneal membrane function after prolonged exposure to dialysis solutions. The complement system is a major component of the innate immune system, which provides a first-line defense against pathogens. Uncontrolled activation of the complement system directly contributes to the pathophysiology of rare and common kidney diseases and to a growing number of nonrenal diseases. Here, we review currently available evidence of complement activation in patients treated with PD and its association with structural and functional alterations of the peritoneal membrane. Mainly, evidence point toward a local, intraperitoneal, production of complement molecules in response to PD exposure. Dialysis fluids, particularly glucose, play a role in complement activation and dysregulation leading to untoward PD-related pathophysiological processes such as peritoneal fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy and, perhaps, encapsulating peritoneal fibrosis development. These findings could lead to further development and use of anticomplement therapeutics in PD patients to prevent membrane damage.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Borceux, Pauline; Morelle, Johann; Goffin, Eric (2020): Complement system activation and peritoneal membrane alterations: Culprit or innocent bystander?. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4816455