Cognitive-Affective Inconsistency and Ambivalence: Impact on the Overall Attitude–Behavior Relationship

Published on 2020-08-05T12:10:56Z (GMT) by
<div><p>This research explored whether overall attitude is a stronger predictor of behavior when underlying cognitive-affective inconsistency or ambivalence is low versus high. Across three prospective studies in different behaviors and populations (Study 1: eating a low-fat diet, <i>N</i> = 136 adults, eating five fruit and vegetables per day, <i>N</i> = 135 adults; Study 2: smoking initiation, <i>N</i> = 4,933 adolescents; and Study 3: physical activity, <i>N</i> = 909 adults) we tested cognitive-affective inconsistency and ambivalence individually and simultaneously as moderators of the overall attitude–behavior relationship. Across studies, more similar effects were observed for inconsistency compared with ambivalence (in both individual and simultaneous analyses). Meta-analysis across studies supported this conclusion with both cognitive-affective inconsistency and ambivalence being significant moderators when considered on their own, but only inconsistency being significant when tested simultaneously. The reported studies highlight the importance of cognitive-affective inconsistency as a determinant of the strength of overall attitude.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Conner, Mark; Wilding, Sarah; van Harreveld, Frenk; Dalege, Jonas (2020): Cognitive-Affective Inconsistency and Ambivalence: Impact on the Overall Attitude–Behavior Relationship. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.5083163.v1