Change Appeals: How Referencing Change Boosts Curiosity and Promotes Persuasion

Published on 2020-08-06T12:08:52Z (GMT) by
<div><p>Does merely referencing that an object or entity has changed affect people’s attitudes and intentions toward it? This research investigates the possibility that change references spark curiosity and information seeking, which can have a positive or negative effect on people’s evaluations of a target stimulus, depending on the information environment. Seven experiments reveal that referencing that an object or entity has changed decreases perceptions of its longevity, but also sparks curiosity about it—a desire to learn more. This curiosity motivates people to seek information about the object or entity, which can enhance or depress their evaluations depending on whether that information search leads to favorable or unfavorable information. When further information is unavailable, change references appear to have a negative impact on people’s evaluations, consistent with well-established longevity biases. This research suggests that change references have an important and generalizable impact on persuasive outcomes and pinpoints the conditions surrounding and processes driving this effect.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Kupor, Daniella; Jia, Jayson; Tormala, Zakary (2020): Change Appeals: How Referencing Change Boosts Curiosity and Promotes Persuasion. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.5084220.v1