Alcohol use in adolescents and adult psychopathology and social outcomes: Findings from a 35-year cohort study

Published on 2020-05-24T12:07:44Z (GMT) by
<div>Objective:<p>To examine the consequences of alcohol consumption and symptoms of alcohol use disorder during adolescence and later adulthood psychopathology and social outcomes.</p>Methods:<p>A longitudinal, prospective birth cohort study, the Christchurch Health and Development Study, was examined across a 35-year period. We estimated the associations between two measures of adolescent alcohol use (volume of alcohol consumed and symptoms of alcohol use disorder) and two later internalising disorders, externalising psychopathology measured by substance use disorders and psychosocial outcomes in adulthood, adjusting for individual and family factors from childhood.</p>Results:<p>The pattern of results indicates alcohol symptoms predict internalising disorder in adulthood. Volume of alcohol used in adolescence predicted adult substance use disorders, lower educational attainment and higher risk of welfare benefit receipt in adulthood in fully adjusted models.</p>Conclusion:<p>Early consumption of larger volumes of alcohol led to continuation of this pattern in adult life with resulting poorer educational achievement, increased welfare benefit receipt and substance use disorders. Early symptoms of alcohol use disorder, however, led to increased adult levels of mental health disorders. This relationship persisted within a 20-year study period and after adjustment for statistically significant covariate factors. The study shows that early patterns of alcohol use have a direct and specific impact upon adult outcomes.</p></div>

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Boden, Joseph; Blair, Sarah; Newton-Howes, Giles (2020): Alcohol use in adolescents and adult psychopathology and social outcomes: Findings from a 35-year cohort study. SAGE Journals. Collection. https://doi.org/10.25384/SAGE.c.4990706.v1